Records of Henry Green School, 1923-1992

Object number

BD225

Date

1923 – 1992

Extent

5 bound volumes

Level

FONDS

Description

This collection comprises the log books (1924-1992) and a punishment book (1923-1956) of Henry Green School, formerly known as Green Lane School.

History

Henry Green School, formerly known as Green Lane School, on Green Lane, Dagenham was opened by the Essex County Council Education Committee in 1923. On the official opening of the school, which had 21 classrooms and two assembly rooms, it was the largest elementary school in Essex.

Conditions governing access

Open to research.

Conditions governing reproduction

At the discretion of the Borough Archivist.

Physical description

Bound volumes.

Condition

Notes

Catalogued by Clare Sexton, Assistant Archivist in accordance with ISAD(G).

Looking for records

This material can be accessed by appointment in our reading room, which is situated in the Visitor’s Centre at Valence House Museum. To make an appointment please email: localstudies@lbbd.gov.uk or telephone 020 8227 2033

5 thoughts on “Records of Henry Green School, 1923-1992

    1. Hi June, Henry Green was the headmaster at the school when it first opened. The school was originally called Green Lane School and changed its name later in recognition of Henry Green.

  1. I went to this school from 1952-1958. I remember the toilets were in the middle of the playground, it had no roof.
    I played in the sand pits at the north end. It had bomb craters where six bombs exploded 1940 wiping out houses in Baron road. So the bomb craters remained. We used them to hid out. Great fun!

    My sports teacher was Mr Welford, I tripped him up once playing football, he fell over breaking his glasses and tearing his sports jacket. He was not amused. He told me to tackle Boy! So I did.

    Lovely school. I remember once when they pulled down the blinds in the hall and we all had to sit on the floor. They showed a film on a screen, it was ‘laurel and hardy’. I never forgot the smell of celluloid and cheesy feet. I eventually became a film cameraman. I travelled all around the world. Lovely school in every respect.

  2. I went to this school from 1952-1958. I remember the toilets were in the middle of the playground, it had no roof.
    I played in the sand pits at the north end. It had bomb craters where six bombs exploded 1940 wiping out houses in Baron road. So the bomb craters remained. We used them to hid out. Great fun!

    My sports teacher was Mr Welford, I tripped him up once playing football, he fell over breaking his glasses and tearing his sports jacket. He was not amused. He told me to tackle Boy! So I did.

    Lovely school. I remember once when they pulled down the blinds in the hall and we all had to sit on the floor. They showed a film on a screen, it was ‘laurel and hardy’. I never forgot the smell of celluloid and cheesy feet. I eventually became a film cameraman. I travelled all around the world. Lovely school in every respect.

  3. I attended this school until March 1955, just before my seventh birthday at the end of March, when we moved from Valence Ave to a new LCC estate in Langley. I remember my best friend was called Sylvia, but she’d been at home sick for a while before I left, and I was upset that I never got to say goodbye to her. There was a lime tree art the front of the school, that I called ‘my tree’, and whenever my mum and I walked past I’d make her reach up and pick a leaf for me. When we got to Langley I had to do one term in a horrible old Victorian infant school which I hated, before I started in a new, bright junior school.

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Metadata
Start date1923
End date1992